Appalachian

Outline

Key Indicators

Rating

BB§

Ranking

24

Outlook

Uncertain

Commentary

The continued expansion of play types means that the Basin will remain a focus for activity. However, despite a supportive State regulator, the overriding concern is at the Federal level, and to what extent the Biden Administration will use Federal powers to override State legislation to prevent oil & gas development.

Updated

June 17, 2021

Outline

Region

Americas - North

Position

Onshore

Hydrocarbon

Gas

Location

Appalachian

Description

The Appalachian Basin is a foreland basin containing Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks of Early Cambrian through Early Permian age. From north to south, the Appalachian Basin Province crosses New York, Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, West Virginia, western Maryland, eastern Kentucky, western Virginia, eastern Tennessee, north-western Georgia, and north-eastern Alabama. A complexly thrust faulted and folded terrane (Appalachian Fold and Thrust Belt or Eastern Overthrust Belt), formed at the end of the Palaeozoic by the Alleghenian orogeny, characterizes the eastern flank of the Basin. Allochthonous metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Blue Ridge Thrust Belt that bounds the eastern part of the Appalachian Basin Province were thrust westward more than 150 mi over lower Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks. The Appalachian Basin province covers an area of about 185,500 sq. mi. The province is 1,075 mi long from northeast to southwest and between 20 to 310 mi wide from northwest to southeast.

Summary

While widely explored, the Basin continues to present new play types, not least the growing focus on shale gas. However, the low gas price presents a headwind to most activity.

Source: ESRI, BGS, USGS & OGA data

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