Suriname

Investment & Operational Criteria

Key Indicators

Risk Premia

0.625

%

Outlook

Positive

Rating

A|2S|+

Ranking

19

Reserves (1P)

Total

mm boe

Oil

100

%

Summary

The recent offshore drilling success have supported the country and made it an attractive location in which to operate.

Updated

May 18, 2021

Country Basics

Region

Americas - South

Reserves (1P)

Oil

mm bbl

Gas

bcf

Location

SurinameSuriname

Northern South America, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between French Guiana and Guyana

Outline

Tax Regime
Type

PSC/PSA

Tax Regime
Notes

Suriname has a relatively standard form of Production Sharing Contract ("PSC") fiscal regime. Royalty rates, cost recovery ceilings and corporate income tax rates are all fixed. Profit oil splits vary with project profitability (the R-Factor). There are some indirect taxes, but no bonuses, rentals or fees are payable.

Investment & 
Operational
Climate

Suriname officially supports and encourages business development through local and foreign investment. The overall investment climate favors U.S. investors with experience working in developing countries. To attract foreign direct investment (FDI), authorities have planned to update institutional and legal frameworks to protect investors and eliminate restrictions regarding investment income transfers and control related FDI flows. However, the World Trade Organization’s 2019 Trade Policy Review concluded that Suriname’s investment regime has not changed since its last review in 2013. The report states that the overall regime, particularly the approval of FDI, may be discretionary rather than rules-based. The extractives sector has historically attracted significant foreign direct investment, but numerous factors negatively impact the investment climate as a whole. January 2020 saw Apache and Total announce a “significant oil discovery” off the coast of Suriname, followed by a similar discovery in April 2020. Experts estimate that it will take 5-10 years to begin offshore oil production, assuming world oil prices support it. The CEO of state-owned oil company Staatsolie estimates that the government of Suriname could earn $10-$15 billion over the course of 20 years if production reaches similar levels as in neighboring Guyana.

Source: ESRI, Heritage Index, HMG Foreign & Commonwealth Office, US Department of State, International Trade Administration, International Law Review, Ernst & Young, Wood Makenzie & OGA data.

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